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Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants

The Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants came into force in 2004. It aims to protect human health and the environment from Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs). The Convention requires Parties to take steps to eliminate or reduce the production, use, import, export and emissions into the environment of POPs and includes provisions on access to information, public awareness, training and participation in the development of implementation plans.

Parties (Countries)

CountryState party since

10/09/2003

25/01/2005

03/10/2005

07/06/2004

25/01/2010

03/06/2003

16/06/2004

20/01/2005

22/10/2008

06/02/2007

21/12/2007

08/08/2003

04/05/2007

07/06/2004

27/05/2008

30/07/2008

12/09/2007

23/05/2005

01/06/2007

10/02/2003

01/12/2005

05/03/2003

01/04/2004

14/09/2005

21/05/2004

04/10/2002

15/09/2005

20/09/2011

13/12/2002

09/02/2004

19/04/2005

Highlights

Access to information (articles 9.5, 10.1 and 10.2)

For the purposes of this Convention, information on health and safety of humans and the environment shall not be regarded as confidential.

Each Party shall, within its capabilities, ensure that the public has access to information regarding persistent organic pollutants and their health and environmental effects, and that the information is kept up-to-date.

Information exchange (article 9)

Each Party shall facilitate or undertake the exchange of information relevant to: (a) The reduction or elimination of the production, use and release of persistent organic pollutants; and (b) Alternatives to persistent organic pollutants, including information relating to their risks as well as to their economic and social costs. Each Party shall also designate a national focal point for the exchange of such information.

Awareness building and public education/ environmental education/gender (article 10.1)

Each Party shall, within its capabilities, promote and facilitate the provision to the public of all available information   and the development and implementation, especially for women, children and the least educated, of educational and public awareness programmes on persistent organic pollutants, as well as on their health and environment.

Information in the hands of private parties (article 10.3)

Each Party shall, within its capabilities, encourage industry and professional users to promote and facilitate the provision of the information at the national level and, as appropriate, subregional, regional and global levels.

Pollutant release and transfer registers (article 10.5)

Each Party shall give sympathetic consideration to developing mechanisms, such as pollutant release and transfer registers, for the collection and dissemination of information on estimates of the annual quantities of the chemicals listed in Annex A, B or C that are released or disposed of.

Public participation/ Gender (articles 7.2 and 10.1)

The Parties shall, where appropriate consult their national stakeholders, including women’s groups and groups involved in the health of children, in order to facilitate the development, implementation and updating of their obligations arising from the Convention.

Each Party shall also promote and facilitate public participation in addressing persistent organic pollutants and their health and environmental effects and in developing adequate responses.