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Latin America and the Caribbean: Ratification of Multilateral Environmental Agreements

Since 1992 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean have made progress in strengthening the environmental pillar of sustainable development, including through adherence with international multilateral agreements.
Cuadro AMUMAS
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The United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (1992), also known as the "Earth Summit" or "Rio Summit" was a turning point in raising environmental awareness and laid the groundwork for global progress towards sustainable development. The Declaration on Environment and Development was adopted at the Conference. Its 27 principles (including Principle 10) have been a continuing source of policies and laws aimed at sustainable development.The Convention on Biological Diversity and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change were also opened for signature at the conference and the foundation was laid for the negotiation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification, subsequently adopted in 1994. From 1992 to date, countries of Latin America and the Caribbean have made progress in strengthening the environmental pillar of sustainable development, including through adhering to international multilateral agreements, many of which include provisions relating to Principle 10. As can be seen in the table below, the 33 countries of Latin America and the Caribbean have ratified the three conventions emanating from the Earth Summit.